spinTorsion

Superluminal spin torsion radiation from the Sun

1. Summary

This experiment investigates the effects of spin torsion radiation from the Sun.

In the earth field experiment a spin torsion generator was used to investigate the effect of planet rotation on spin torsion fields. The same apparatus can also be used to investigate spin torsion radiation from the Sun. However this experiment presents a different simpler method. The reason for using a different method was that it became necessary to be able to point the apparatus at the sun with high accuracy, something that was difficult previously to achieve. The method uses a shadow method to provide an angular accuracy of better than 0.2° and an inclinometer to provide tilt accuracy to 0.2°

The experiment shows that spin torsion radiation from the sun does not come from the expected direction but that it comes from a direction approximately 2° west of the expected position. This point corresponds to the real position of the sun. The two degree difference occurs because of the time it takes for light from the sun to reach earth. The experiment shows that spin torsion radiation from the sun reaches earth almost instantaneously.

This result strongly suggests that spin torsion radiation travels much faster than light. It is generally believed that particles that travel faster than light speeds are impossible because such speeds would violate causality and would imply time travel, however the quantum mechanical phenomena of superluminal information transfer in quantum teleportation experiments such as those carried out by Alain Aspect is commonly accepted and it is possible that spin torsion radiation plays a part in this.

The experiment also shows that spin torsion radiation can pass through the planet apparently unattenuated but can be deflected by a strong magnetic field.

 

 

 

2. Measurement of the spin torsion fields created by the sun

2.1 Equipment

Figure 1 shows a 1 metre long Aluminium tube a which passes through wooden block e which can be pivoted up and down (in altitude). The pivot angle is measured using a digital inclinometer.

Baseboard f can itself be pivoted horizontally about b (in azimuth) with respect to g. The baseboard is 1 metre long and has an angle scale h at the opposite end to pivot b. All of the pivots are of brass.

Once the initial direction of the baseboard has been set, the whole assembly can be adjusted by plus or minus five degrees from the nominal angle using scale h which is marked in 0.1° intervals.

Pivot block e has a white painted face c. In use the equipment can be aligned with the Sun by adjusting the elevation and azimuth of the tube to minimise the shadow of the tube on face c. This must of course be done on a sunny day.

This method allows the tube to be aligned with the Sun to better than 0.2°

 

Fig. 1  Pivoting tube


Response from the Sun at 170 degrees
Fig. 2 Response from the Sun at 170 degrees
 

2.2 Measurement method

The method used to investigate torsion fields from the Sun was first to align the tube with the Sun by minimising the shadow on face c in figure 1 . This was done at a time when the Sun was to the south and at right angles to windows in the room to eliminate any unknown diffraction effects. The time was noted and this became the start time.

Base e in figure 1 was pivoted so that the tube was then pointing three degrees further west.

Measurements of the interference fringe created by the tube along an west-east track were made at intervals.

It was expected that a response would be obtained at 12 minutes from the start time - after the planet had rotated three degrees and the tube re-aligned with the Sun. The dip in the plot of Fig 2 shows what actually happened. The dip occurred 4 minutes after the start time when the tube was aligned with the real position of the Sun and indicated that spin torsion radiation from the sun travelled to Earth almost instantaneously.

2.3 Real and Visible positions of the Sun

Figure 3 shows the relationship between the real and visible positions of the Sun. If the observer looks along a tube in direction a they will not see the Sun. However as the earth rotates anticlockwise, then after 8 minutes the observer will be looking in direction b and the Sun will be visible. The delay of eight minutes is caused by the time it takes for light from the Sun to reach Earth. During that time Earth will have rotated 2° counterclockwise. The real position of the Sun is always 2° degrees west of its visible position.

If spin torsion radiation from the sun is detected when the observer is looking in direction a. then the radiation from the sun must be travelling to Earth almost instantaneously.

 

 

Real and visible positions of the Sun

Fig. 3  Real and visible positions of the Sun
Response from the Sun at 248 degrees
Fig. 4  Response from the Sun at 248 °
 

2.4 A repeat measurement

In order to check whether the Earth's magnetic field might be influencing the measurements the experiment was repeated. The apparatus was first aligned with the Sun as before but then its alignment was shifted to 284° using a digital protractor. This method was used because the tube was obscured from seeing the visible Sun at this angle.

Cybersky astronomy software [1] was used to determine the precise time at which the sun would be at 248°. This was the start time of the experiment. The Sun elevation angle at this time was also determined and the tube was set at this angle using a digital inclinometer.

Using the angle scale, the apparatus was set to point 4° further west. Measurements of fringe distance were then made along a north/south track.

 

Because the pointing angle of the apparatus had been moved further west by 4°, the sun would be expected to align with the tube after 16 minutes. In fact figure 4 shows a sharp dip after 8 minutes and confirms the previous result. Also there does not appear to be any significant change caused by the apparatus being at a different angle in the Earth's magnetic field.

 

2.5 Radiation passing through Earth

In order to check if spin torsion radiation can pass through the planet, the tube of figure 1 must be pointed downwards at the sun when it is below the horizon.

To calibrate the equipment the tube in figure 1 was pointed upwards and aligned with the Sun in the south using the shadow method at around midday. The time was noted and the Sun azimuth angle determined using Cybersky software.

180° was added to the Sun angle to determine the azimuth angle of the end of the tube that was pointed downwards to the north. Cybersky was used to find the time at which the Sun would align with the end of the tube (even though the Sun would be below the horizon) and the elevation at which this happened. (38° below the horizon) This time was the experiment start time. The tube assembly was rotated 4° to the west and a series of fringe measurements on a west/east measurement track were made at 1 minute intervals after the start time.

 

Response when the Sun was below the horizon

Fig. 5 Response when the Sun was below the horizon

The tube was aligned to an azimuth of 358 and an elevation of -38° (38° below the horizon) and figure 5 shows a response after approximately 8 minutes. This corresponds to radiation being received when the planet had rotated through 2° when the tube was aligned with the real position of the sun as shown in figure 3.

The results of the previous 2 sets of measurements are confirmed, again indicating that the response was from the real position of the Sun and that the spin torsion radiation travelled faster than light.

In this experiment spin torsion radiation from the sun had to travel through the mass of the planet since the Sun was 38° below the horizon, The radiation appears to be unattenuated by its passage through the planet

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3. Deflection of spin torsion radiation by magnetic fields

Figure 6 shows three cases where pivoting tube a shown in figure 1 is directed towards the real position s of the Sun.

Case1. The tube was misaligned with the real position This resulted in a series of interference fringes appearing to the left and right with fringe distance f.

Case 2. The tube is correctly aligned with the real position of the Sun. This was achieved by first aligning the tube with the optical position of the sun using the shadow method and then moving the pointing angle 2 degrees to the west (clockwise). At this position the fringe distance f reduced to zero.

case 3. Spin torsion radiation from the sun was passed between the poles of a large permanent magnet m whose details can be found in the Magnetic Field Effects experiment. The poles were 15cm apart and the spacing between the poles and the end of tube a was 15cm. The magnetic field between the poles was 6000 µT. With the magnet in place interference fringes could again be detected.

 

Magnetic deflection cases 1 to 3

Fig. 6 Magnetic deflection cases 1 to 3

Magnetic deflection cases 4 and 5

Fig 7 Magnetic deflection cases 4 and 5

 

 

The reason that fringes reappeared in case 3 was that the magnet deflected the radiation beam so that it was no longer aligned with the tube.

Case 4. The north pole of the magnet was to the left of the radiation beam. It was necessary to change the alignment of the tube by 0.75° degrees to the west (clockwise) to restore the condition where the fringe distance went to zero. The magnet thus deflected the beam by 0.75 degrees.

Case 5. The north pole was to the right. In this case the alignment of the tube had to be changed by 0.75° to the east (counterclockwise)

4. Comments

The results of this experiment show that spin torsion radiation from the sun is detected when the observer is looking in direction a in figure 3. This is the real position of the Sun and that means that spin torsion radiation from the Sun must be travelling to Earth almost instantaneously. The results also show that the radiation is able to travel through the mass of the planet. It is generally believed that particles that travel faster than light speeds are impossible because such speeds would violate causality and would imply time travel. However in 1935, Einstein, Podolsky and Rosen [2] [3] described a thought experiment that concluded that descriptions of reality provided by Quantum Mechanics - the physics that currently underpins our knowledge of reality - were incomplete because they suggested that there could be spooky action at a distance between two particles in contradiction of the light speed limitation.

In 1964 John Bell [4] proved that quantum physics was incompatible with the idea that there could be local variables whose details were unknown, whose influences were constrained by the speed of light, but which could cause particles to apparently interact instantaneously.

In the early 1980s, Alain Aspect [5] carried out experiments which showed that two entangled electrons do appear to be able to communicate with each other instantaneously despite the electrons being separated from each other by significant distances. These experiments confirmed John Bell's predictions and instantaneous communication between particles is now called Quantum Teleportation.

It is suggested that spin torsion radiation is responsible for superluminal Quantum Teleportation effects and may lead to a reconciliation of relativity and quantum mechanics.

More evidence of superluminal propagation is provided by the experiment on the propagation speed of a spin torsion field in which comparisons of the performance of an inductor in a spin torsion field with a calculation of how it would behave if it were in a conventional electromagnetic circuit indicated that the propagation speed was three orders of magnitude greater than light speed.

Further evidence of superluminal radiation from the Sun is provided by M. M. Lavrentiev, V. A. Gusev, I. A. Eganova, M .K. Lutset and S. F. Fominykh [6] using the 2m telescope at the Crimea national observatory. They reported that a special resistor at the focal point of the telescope which was blanked off to visible light responded to radiation from the Sun when the telescope was pointed at the true position of the Sun.

 

The magnetic deflection effects described in section 3 shows that spin torsion radiation can be deflected by magnetic fields. This raises the question of whether radiation from the visible position of the sun is being deflected by the Earths magnetic field so that it appears to come from the real position of the Sun at superluminal speed. There are several counter arguments to this.

i) It is curious that any deflection should cause the radiation to come from the real position of the Sun rather than some arbitrary position.

ii) The experimental results of figure 2 were obtained with the system pointed south. In that direction deflection by the Earth's field would be expected to be in an up down direction rather than in the east west direction of the field that the magnet applied.

iii) The results from 2.4 shown in figure 4 were taken from a different angle to the Sun and do not show any difference to the results shown in figure 2.

The magnetic field effect experiment provides more information on the effects of a magnetic field on a Spin Torsion generator.

 

5. References

[1] http://www.cybersky.com

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EPR_paradox

[3] Einstein, A; B Podolsky; N Rosen (1935-05-15). "Can Quantum-Mechanical Description of Physical Reality be Considered Complete?" (PDF). Physical Review. 47 (10): 777–780. Bibcode:1935PhRv...47..777E. doi:10.1103/PhysRev.47.777

[4] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bell's_theorem

[5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aspect's_experiment

[6] M. M. Lavrentiev, V. A. Gusev, I. A. Eganova, M .K. Lutset and S. F. Fominykh
Detection of the true position of the Sun. Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 315, 368-370 November 1990
Translated in Sov. Phys. Dokl. 35(11), November 1990 pp 957-959

 

 

 


 

 

 

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