spinTorsion

Effects caused by the rotation of the planet

1. Summary

As the planet rotates on its axis it creates spin torsion fields because of its rotation. These effects have been investigated using a Spin Torsion Generator (STG)

The essence of a Spin Torsion Generator (STG) is a rotating mass (see Sun, Spin and Polyethylene). STGs generate torsion fields that are aligned with their axis of rotation. By mounting an STG on a pan and tilt mechanism the interaction between the STG field and the Earth's axis of rotation can be clearly seen.

When the plane of rotation of the STG is parallel to the plane of rotation of the equator there is a very distinct drop in the distance between measured interference fringes. When the plane of rotation of the STG is at right angle to the plane of the equatorial axis there is a distinct peak in the fringe distance that suggests that the fringe distance may go to infinity .

 

  2. Spin torsion fields created by the rotation of Earth

Figure 1 shows an STG which can be pivoted on an east west axis. It can be set to be either parallel to the plane of the equator or at right angles to it.

An MDF sheet with crossed polyethylene polarisers below is placed beneath the STG to eliminate any effects from the polarised mass below.

To investigate the interaction between the field from the STG and the effects caused by the rotation of the Earth (which can be thought of as a massive STG!) fringe distances were measures westward from the STG on an east/west measurement track. The distances were measured as the STG was set to a range of angles from 0 to 90 degrees to the south. All angles were set using a digital inclinometer.

 


Fig. 1  Pivoting STG


Fig. 2 Horizontal STG
 

Fig 2 shows an STG, pivoted on an east west axis so that the plane of its rotation is parallel to the plane of Earth's equator.

The City of Edinburgh where this experiment took place is at a latitude of 56 degrees north and the diagram shows that the STG has to be pivoted up to the south by 34 degrees from the local horizon.

 

Fig. 3 shows that when the STG was tilted up from the south, a distinct minimum was obtained at a tilt angle of 34°. Fig. 2 shows that the STG alignment at this angle is parallel to the equatorial axis. Radiation from the STG appears to be complementing the radiation generated by the rotation of planet Earth.

 


Fig. 3 Results from pivoting up to south


Fig. 4 Vertical STG
 

Fig. 4 shows the same STG but this time pivoted up at the north to an angle of 56° from the local horizontal so that its plane of rotation is at right angles to the plane of the equator

Fig. 5 shows that when the STG was tilted up from the north, a distinct maximum was obtained at a tilt angle of 56°. Fig. 4 shows that the STG alignment at this angle is at right angles to the equatorial axis. It is believed that radiation from the STG does not cause interference with radiation generated by the rotation of planet Earth.

 



Fig. 5 Results from pivoting up to north

On Saturday 30th July 1994 in Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia Garry Kemlo [1] carried out some experiments in which he used a 2.5m long rectangular pipe arranged so that it could be tilted north at various angles. For each angle he then measured fringes on an east/west measurement track and got the results shown in figure 6. The curve has a striking resemblance to the plot in figure 1 but the minimum was obtained at an angle of 60°.

 


Fig. 6 Results from New South Wales

 

Fig. 7   New South Wales  

New South Wales is at a latitude of 32.9° south and the magnetic dip angle there is 60°. The minimum in the plot of figure 6 occurs when the pipe is tilted 60° up from the north. Figure 7 shows that at that angle the pipe is almost parallel to the equatorial axis.


3. Comments

It may be noted that in comparing the plots of figures 3 and 5 the fringe distance values at 0° and 90° do not correspond. This is because the plots were not taken at the same time and fringe distances measured in this way change over time as the Earth rotates and the Sun changes it position in relation to the local horizontals.

The floor screen below the STG is an MDF sheet with crossed polyethylene polarisers below it. Its purpose is to eliminate any effects from the polarised mass below. Experiments were carried out in a building with relatively lightweight construction. Where the built environment is of high mass ( eg. building constructed of stone) and even in open areas surrounded by large stone walls such a floor screen is not always effective. The result of this is that sometimes measurements can be unstable and interference fringes take a long time to settle to their final value.

Although the 2.5m long pipe experiment of Kemlo took place in 1994, the data from the experiment only came to light after the STG experiment was carried out in Edinburgh. Kemlo's results do show a small angle error with the minimum in figure 6 deviating by 2.9° from the predicted angle of 57.1° shown in figure 7. It seems likely because of this that Kemlo decided that the minimum of figure 6 was caused by the magnetic dip angle of 60° in Newcastle. In Edinburgh the latitude is 56° and the dip angle is 70° so there is no possibility of confusion.

It is interesting to note that the apparatus in the Superluminal spin torsion radiation from the Sun experiment and the Galactic torsion fields experiment both effectively use a tilting tube. This was because the tube method allows greater angular accuracy. Iit has however been found that tilting an STG gives similar results.

 

4. References

[] Kemlo K.G. Dowsing, An Electrodynamic Explanation. March 10th 1995. Self published in Newcastle NSW Australia.

 

 

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